Li et al from Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory for Prevention and Treatment of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology Diseases with Chinese Medicine reviewed and summarized the physical therapy modalities of western medicine (WM) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of MGD[1]. The meibomian gland is a unique sebaceous gland located in the eyelid. Its main function is to secrete lipids and form the lipid layer of the tear film to delay the evaporation of waterborne tears, increase the surface tension of the tear film, and to lubricate the contact area of the eyelid and eyeball. Abnormal secretion of the meibomian gland is known as meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), which has become the most important cause of evaporative dry eye disease (DED). The clinical pathophysiological process and underlying molecular mechanisms of MGD are not clear. As serious side effects may occur with the long-term use of hormonotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the treatment of MGD, meibomian gland physiotherapy is considered the most effective and safest therapy for MGD. This review summarizes the physical therapy modalities of western medicine (WM) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of MGD to provide optimal treatments for these patients and to further lay a foundation for mechanistic studies of MGD.

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Chhadva,  et al. Meibomian gland disease: the role of gland dysfunction in dry eye disease. Ophthalmology

Findaly, et al. Dry eye disease: when to treat and when to refer. Aust Prescr

Reference

Li J, Ou S, Li W, Liu Z, Peng Q. Physical Therapy Modalities of Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine for Meibomian Gland Dysfunction. Digital Chinese Medicine. 2020 Dec 1;3(4):229-38.

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