After two years of hard work, my new book titled Extraordinary Acupoints: Atlas of Applications is finally available!

This book was the first atlas on the applications of EA with fine illustrations and annotations. Although there are more than 2000 EA, a large part of them is hardly used. I studied a lot of ancient literatures and modern researches to screen those acupoints practically used in the clinic. This book covered not only 51 traditional ex-traordinary acupoints (TEA) but also 97 Master Tung Acupuncture (MTA) and 39 Pingheng Acupuncture (PHA) points, which are widely used.

Preface, Extraordinary Acupoints: Atlas of Applications is available

Preface

Extraordinary Acupoints (EA) are defined as acupoints that have a specific location and indication but are not included in the nomenclature system of the 14 channels (12 primary channels, Du and Ren) (Chan and Li, 2006). For instance, Yin Tang (EX-HN3) is located on the Du channel, but it is not included in the standard Du acupoints system; Tai Yang (EX-HN5) is not located on any of the 14 primary channels. The earliest record of EA i.e. Qi Shu (奇腧) which is literally translated as extraordinary acupoints, dates back to Huang Di Nei Jing (The Yellow Emperor’s Inner Classic). In the Bei Ji Qian Jin Yao Fang (Prescriptions Worth Thousand Gold for Emergencies) published in 652 A.D. by Sun Simiao, 187 EA are recorded. In Lei Jing Tu Yi (Illustrations of the Classic of Categorizing) published in 1624 A.D. by Zhang Jingyue, 84 EA are recorded. In the Zhen Jiu Ji Cheng (Acupuncture and Moxibustion Collection) published in 1874 A.D. by Liao Runhong, 144 EA are recorded. In the Zhen Jiu Jing Wai Qi Xue Tu Pu (Illustration of Extraordinary Acupoints) published in 1963 by Hao Jinkai, 588 EA are recorded. In 2018, the Zhen Jiu Jing Wai Qi Xue Tu Pu (Illustration of Extraordinary Acupoints) was re-published, and it covered 1649 EA, among which 345 EA are located on the 14 channels, and 1213 are not (Hao, 2018). Liu Yan collected 2200 EA in his book Zhong Hua Qi Xue Da Cheng (The Chinese Great Compendium of Extraordinary Acupoints) (Liu, 2001).

Besides the 48 standard traditional extraordinary acupoints (TEA), the acupoints in Master Tung Acupuncture (MTA) can also be regarded as EA. Actually, Dong Jing Chang or Tung Chin Chang (董景昌) in 1973 named his book as Dong Shi Zhen Jiu Zheng Jing Qi Xue Xue, which was translated as Tung’s Extraordinary Acupoints on Ordinary Channels. It is said that Master Tung used 740 EA, but only 672 are found in this book (Liu, 2011). Additionally, the 38 acupoints of the Pingheng Acupuncture (PHA, 平衡針灸)[1] System established by Dr. Wang Wen Yuan (王文遠) can also be regarded as EA (Zhang, 2016).

I studied MTA and PHA in 2007 from my clinic supervisor Dr. Zhang Fen Sheng (張汾生) in the Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Teaching Hospital of Chengdu University of TCM, China. From then on, I was advocated in research, clinical use, and teaching of EA. After 2012, I taught MTA and PHA in China, Denmark, Germany, and Sweden.  In 2016, I published a paper named “Introduction on Pingheng (Balance) Acupuncture” in Chinesische Medizin, a professional Chinese medical journal published in Munich, Germany. After I moved to Denmark in 2017, I’ve taught dozens of basic and advanced MTA courses.  My clinical and teaching experiences and extensive feedbacks from students motivated me to write the book.

Literally speaking, the acupoints from the different types of micro-system acupuncture e.g. Auricular Acupuncture, Abdominal Acupuncture, and Eye Acupuncture, can also be regarded as EA. These acupoints were not involved in this book because they are found/created based on biological holography theory and microscopic reflection, which differ from the traditional acupuncture theories and are very difficult to explain with traditional acupoints and channels’ distribution.

This book was the first atlas on the applications of EA with fine illustrations and annotations. Although there are more than 2000 EA, a large part of them is hardly used. I studied a lot of ancient literatures and modern researches to screen those acupoints practically used in the clinic. This book covered not only 51 traditional extraordinary acupoints (TEA) but also 97 Master Tung Acupuncture (MTA) and 39 Pingheng Acupuncture (PHA) points, which are widely used.

In order to make this handbook as practical as possible, acupoints were selected based on the following criteria:

(1) Easily stimulated by acupuncture and moxibustion
(2) Recognized, i.e. recorded in classical literature or textbooks on acupuncture and moxibustion
(3) Modern acupoints applied extensively and repeatedly validated, e.g., MTA, PHA, Qian Zheng (Z10.28), etc.
(4) Acupoints frequently reported in researches e.g. PHA

As the book covered acupoints from different resources, a unique numbering system was created to facilitate clinical use, teaching, and research. The nomenclature is based on 1) the English translation of the Chinese name of each acupoint and 2) an alphanumeric code derived from the 12 zones of the body, including the finger, hand, forearm, upper arm, toe, foot, shank, thigh, ear, head, front of the body, and back of the body. Relevant background and theory behind the 12 zones were also clarified.

Explanations of the indications were based on EA’s location and internal connections to Zang and Fu organs and various structures of the body e.g. brain, uterus, throat etc. Most of the explanations were enlightened by my research of Ling Shu (Spiritual Pivot)[2], MTA, neurology, and biomedicine. Actually, plenty of EA can be regarded as an extension of the standard acupoints. For instance, Zu Er Huo (Z6.1), including Huo Zhu and Huo Ying, are located in the region of Tai Chong – LR3 and their indications are closely related to Tai Chong – LR3, even though they vary from it. Moreover, in order to make EA acupoints easier to understand, I employed the Five Phases Theory, Three Materials Theory, and esp. the Extraordinary Connections between Zang and Fu Organs (臟腑別通) to organize the explanations.  

I hope this collection of extraordinary acupoints will be helpful to my colleagues and benefit many patients.

In the end, I would like to send my sincere thanks to Patricia Bock, Dr. Rainer Nögel, and Dr. Velia Wortman for their medical comments and editing helps.

Foreword

Extraordinary acupoints are often used. They can play an important part in acupuncture treatment. But as we have struggled to grasp the depths and meanings of the traditional Chinese acupuncture system with its channels, branches, and acupoints, we often add extraordinary points to our treatment without much reasoning. They are mainly used due to their reported clinical effectiveness. With a grain of salt, the latter applies equally to the different microsystems emerging in ever-growing numbers.

So, it is a brave task of Dr. Hui Zhang to look at the vast numbers of extraordinary points (2200 in Liu Yan’s book published in 2001!), selecting the most useful with comprehensible methods and a clear approach. Furthermore, he used his great clinical experience to take some very effective and popular points from other traditions to the traditionally classified extraordinary points. 

The newly created and easy-to-understand nomenclature Hui Zhang introduces in his book allows for the exact identification of all the extraordinary points. In combination with the clear illustrations, detailed information on location, manipulation, and clinical indications, it fulfills the promises of a clinically useful coat-pocket atlas.

But the unique point that makes the book even more valuable is the effort to explain in a commentary the indications of each extraordinary acupoint within the system of Chinese Medicine. This is not only intellectually satisfying but will also help to integrate these points better in daily work, where diagnostic methods should rule treatment. Therefore, we no longer need to add extraordinary points to our acupuncture treatment as an empirical-based supplement, which is, nevertheless important. We are now able to select extraordinary points based on our underlying Chinese Medical diagnosis. This is bound to make the acupuncture treatment more selective and, therefore, more effective.

Hui Zhang belongs to a generation of younger Chinese doctors, who are very keen on profound studies of the classics and the preservation of the wisdom and spirit of Chinese Medicine. He has gained a thorough knowledge of classical Chinese Medicine during his studies and he experiences its effectiveness in his daily clinical practice. As he has been lecturing western doctors extensively and successfully on Chinese Medicine topics for many years, he is predestined for authoring this fine book. It combines classical and more recent insights about extraordinary points in an attractive way for eastern and western disciples of Chinese Medicine.

Hui Zhang has woven many aspects of extraordinary acupoints into an innovative approach and created an overdue work solely dedicated to this category of acupuncture points. To my knowledge, it is the first book of this kind in a western language. I wish his book the success it deserves!

Dr. med. Rainer Nögel
President of SMS
Lecturer, TU Munich
Specialist in internal medicine, Chinese medicine
November 1, 2020
Munich, Germany

Content

Foreword I
Preface III
Chapter 1 Introduction – 1 –

  1. Why are EA important? – 3 –
  2. How to understand the indications of EA? – 4 –
    2.1 Definition of category – 4 –
    2.2 Channels Distribution – 5 –
    2.3 Extraordinary Connections between Zang and Fu – 7 –
    2.2.1 Lung and bladder – 8 –
    2.2.2 Spleen and small intestine – 8 –
    2.2.3 Heart and gallbladder – 8 –
    2.2.4 Kidney and Sanjiao – 9 –
    2.2.5 Liver and Large Intestine – 9 –
    2.2.6 Pericardium and Stomach – 9 –
  3. How to group EA? – 9 –
    3.1 The 12 zones of EA – 9 –
    3.2 Linear Array – 10 –
    2.3 Five Phases Theory – 12 –
    2.4 Three Materials Theory – 13 –
  4. How to use EA – 14 –
    4.1 Select EA as primary acupoints – 14 –
    4.2 Select EA as secondary/pattern acupoints – 15 –
    Chapter 2 Extraordinary Acupoints in 12 Zones – 17 –
    Zone 1 Finger – 19 –
    Z1.1 Wu Hu 五虎Five Tigers (MTA) – 22 –
    Z1.2 Feng Yan 鳳眼 Phoenix Eyes (TEA) – 22 –
    Z1.3 Zhi Wu 制污 Pus Expelling (MTA) – 23 –
    Z1.4 Da Gu Kong 大骨空 Big Bone Emptiness (TEA) – 23 –
    Z1.5 Fu Ke 婦科 Gynecology (MTA) – 24 –
    Z1.6 Mu 木穴 Wood (MTA) – 25 –
    Z1.7 Zhi Shi Ma 指駟馬 Finger Three Horses (MTA) – 25 –
    Z1.8 Mu Huo 木火 Wood Fire (MTA) – 26 –
    Z1.9 Zhong Kui 中魁 Middle Head (TEA) – 27 –
    Z1.10 Quan Jian 拳尖 Fist Tip (TEA) – 27 –
    Z1.11 Fei Xin 肺心 Lung and Heart (MTA) – 28 –
    Z1.12 Xin Xi 心膝 Heart and Knee (MTA) – 28 –
    Z1.13 Dan 膽穴 Gallbladder (MTA) – 29 –
    Z1.14 Huan Chao 還巢 Ovary Recovering (MTA) – 29 –
    Z1.15 Zhi San Chong 指三重 Finger Three Levels (MTA) – 30 –
    Z1.16 Zhi Shen 指腎 Finger Kidney (MTA) – 31 –
    Z1.17 Xiao Gu Kong 小骨空 Small Bone Empty (TEA) – 31 –
    Z1.18 Si Feng 四縫 Four Seams (TEA) – 32 –
    Z1.19 Shi Xuan 十宣 Ten Expellings (TEA) – 32 –
    Zone 2 Hand – 35 –
    Z2.1 Ling Gu 靈谷 Magic Bone (MTA) – 36 –
    Z2.2 Da Bai 大白 Big White (MTA) – 37 –
    Z2.3 Yan Tong 咽痛 Sore Throat (PHA) – 37 –
    Z2.4 Lao Zhen 落枕 Stiff Neck (TEA) – 38 –
    Z2.5 Wai Lao Gong 外勞宮 External PC8 (TEA) – 38 –
    Z2.6 Shang Bai 上白 Upper White (MTA) – 39 –
    Z2.7 Gan Mao 感冒 Common Cold (PHA) – 39 –
    Z2.8 Er Bai 二白 (中白 下白)Two Whites (MTA) – 40 –
    Z2.9 Jing Tong 頸痛 Neck Pain (PHA) – 41 –
    Z2.10 Wan Shun 腕順 Wrist Free (MTA) – 41 –
    Z2.11 Zhi Ma 指麻 Finger Numbness (PHA) – 42 –
    Z2.12 Yao Tong 腰痛 Lumbago (TEA) – 42 –
    Z2.13 Tu Shui 土水 Earth and Water (MTA) – 43 –
    Z2.14 Er Chong 二重 (重仙 重子)Two Doubles – 44 –
    Z2.15 Ya Tong 牙痛 Toothache (TEA) – 44 –
    Z2.16 Shou Jie 手解 Hand Relieving (MTA) – 45 –
    Z2.17 Ba Xie 八邪 Eight Pathogens (TEA) – 45 –
    Zone 3 Forearm – 47 –
    Z3.1 Long Yuan 龍淵 Dragon Chasm (TEA) – 48 –
    Z3.2 San Qi 三其(其門 其角 其正)Three Qi (MTA) – 48 –
    Z3.3 Shou San Huo 手三火(火串 火陵 火山)Three Ar – 49 –
    Z3.4 Xiong Tong 胸痛 Chest Pain (PHA) – 51 –
    Z3.5 Huo Fu Hai 火腑海 Fire Organ Sea (MTA) – 51 –
    Z3.6 Zhi Chuang 痔瘡 Hemorrhoids (PHA) – 52 –
    Z3.7 Xie Huo 瀉火 Fire Draining (PHA) – 52 –
    Z3.8 Xi Tong 膝痛 Knee Pain (PHA) – 53 –
    Z3.9 Shou Er Jin 手二金(手五金 手千金)Arm Two Met – 54 –
    Z3.10 Huai Tong 踝痛 Ankle Pain (PHA) – 55 –
    Z3.11 Shi Mian 失眠 Insomnia (PHA) – 55 –
    Z3.12 Xin Lü 心率 Heart Rate (PHA) – 55 –
    Z3.13 San Shi 三士 (人士 地士 天士)Three Minist – 56 –
    Z3.14 Fei Bing 肺病 Lung Disease (PHA) – 57 –
    Z3.15 Er Bai 二白 Two Whites (TEA) – 57 –
    Z3.16 Jiang Tang 降糖 Blood Sugar Lowering (PHA) – 58 –
    Z3.17 Qu Ling 曲陵 Bending Hill (MTA) – 59 –
    Z3.18 Chang Men 腸門 Intestine’s Door (MTA) – 60 –
    Z3.19 Gan Men 肝門 Liver’s Door (MTA) – 61 –
    Z3.20 Xin Men 心門 Heart’s Door (MTA) – 62 –
    Zone 4 Upper Arm – 63 –
    Z4.1 Zhou Jian 肘尖 Elbow Tip (TEA) – 64 –
    Z4.2 Hou Zhui 後椎 Back Spine (MTA) – 65 –
    Z4.3 Shou Ying 首英Head and Neck (MTA) – 65 –
    Z4.4 Fu Ding 富頂 Rich Peak (MTA) – 65 –
    Z4.5 Hou Zhi 後支 Back Branch (MTA) – 66 –
    Z4.6 Jian Zhong 肩中 Shoulder Center (MTA) – 67 –
    Z4.7 Bei Mian 背面 Back Face (MTA) – 68 –
    Z4.8 Er Tong 二通 (落通 支通)Two Openings (MTA) – 68 –
    Z4.9 Er Qu 二曲(上曲 下曲)Two Bendings (MTA) – 69 –
    Z4.10 Tun Tong 臀痛 Buttock Pain (PHA) – 69 –
    Z4.11 Jia Feng 胛縫 Shoulder Crack (TEA) – 70 –
    Z4.12 Shui Yu 水愈 Water Healing (MTA) – 71 –
    Z4.13 Fen Jin 分金 Metal Separating (MTA) – 71 –
    Z4.14 Ren Zong 人宗 Human Zong Qi (MTA) – 72 –
    Z4.15 Di Zong 地宗 Earth Zong Qi (MTA) – 72 –
    Z4.16 Duo Ming 奪命 Killing (TEA) – 73 –
    Z4.17 Tian Zong 天宗 Heaven Zong Qi (MTA) – 73 –
    Z4.18 Jian Qian 肩前 Shoulder Front (TEA) – 74 –
    Z4.19 Ye Feng 腋縫 Armpit Crack (TEA) – 75 –
    Z4.20 Yun Bai 雲白 Cloud White (MTA) – 75 –
    Zone 5 Toe and Sole – 77 –
    Z5.1 Hai Bao 海豹 Seal (MTA) – 78 –
    Z5.2 Shang Liu 上瘤 Upper Tumor (Z5.2) – 78 –
    Zone 6 Foot – 81 –
    Z6.1 Zu Er Huo 足二火 (火硬 火主) Foot Two Fires – 82 –
    Z6.2 Tou Tong 頭痛 Headache Acupoint (PHA) – 83 –
    Z6.3 Men Jin 門金 Metal Door (MTA) – 83 –
    Z6.4 Mu Dou 木斗 Wood Dipper (MTA) – 84 –
    Z6.5 Mu Liu 木留Wood Pleione (MTA) – 84 –
    Z6.6 Liu Wan 六完 Six End (MTA) – 85 –
    Z6.7 Shui Qu 水曲 Water Bending (MTA) – 86 –
    Z6.8 Wan Tong 腕痛 Wrist Pain (PHA) – 87 –
    Z6.9 Guang Ming 光明 Brightness (PHA) – 87 –
    Z6.10 Zu San Huo 足三火 (火連 火菊 火散) Foot Three – 87 –
    Z6.11 Jiang Ya 降壓 Blood Pressure Lowering (PHA) – 88 –
    Z6.12 Er Shui 二水 (水相 水仙) Two Waters (MTA) – 89 –
    Z6.13 Shui Jing 水晶 Crystal (MTA) – 90 –
    Z6.14 Ba Feng 八風 Eight Winds (TEA) – 90 –
    Zone 7 Calve – 93 –
    Z7.1 San Zheng 三正 (正筋 正宗 正士) Three Rights – 94 –
    Z7.2 Bo Qiu 博球 Ball (MTA) – 94 –
    Z7.3 Jing Lie 精裂 Schizophrenia (PHA) – 95 –
    Z7.4 San Chong 三重 Three Levels (MTA) – 96 –
    Z7.5 Shen Bing 腎病 Kidney Disease (PHA) – 97 –
    Z7.6 Si Hua Shang 四花上 Upper Four Flowers (MTA) – 98 –
    Z7.7 Lan Wei 闌尾 Appendix (TEA) – 99 –
    Z7.8 Si Hua Zhong 四花中 Middle Four Flowers (MTA) – 100 –
    Z7.9 Si Hua Fu 四花副 Assistant Four Flowers (MTA) – 100 –
    Z7.10 Si Hua Xia 四花下 Lower Four Flower (MTA) – 100 –
    Z7.11 Fu Chang 腑腸 Fu and Intestine (MTA) – 101 –
    Z7.12 Xi Yan 膝眼 Knee Eyes (TEA) – 102 –
    Z7.13 Zhou Tong 肘痛 Elbow Pain (PHA) – 102 –
    Z7.14 He Ding 鶴頂 Crane’s Summit (TEA) – 103 –
    Z7.15 Fu Tong 腹痛 Abdominal Pain (PHA) – 103 –
    Z7.16 Ce San Li 側三里 Lateral Three Miles (MTA) – 104 –
    Z7.17 Dan Nang 膽囊 Gallbladder (TEA) – 105 –
    Z7.18 Jian Tong 肩痛 Shoulder Pain (PHA) – 106 –
    Z7.19 Dian Xian 癲癇 Epilepsy (PHA) – 106 –
    Z7.20 Tian Huang 天皇 Heaven Emperor (MTA) – 107 –
    Z7.21 Shen Guan 腎關 Kidney Gate (MTA) – 108 –
    Z7.22 Di Huang 地皇 Earth Emperor (MTA) – 109 –
    Z7.23 Ren Huang 人皇 Human Emperor (MTA) – 109 –
    Z7.24 Si Zhi 四肢 Four Extremities (MTA) – 110 –
    Z7.25 Guang Ming 光明 Brightness (MTA) – 111 –
    Zone 8 Thigh – 113 –
    Z8.1 San Tong 三通 (通關 通山 通天) Three Passings – 114 –
    Z8.2 Si Ma 駟馬 Three Horses (MTA) – 114 –
    Z8.3 Jin Qian 金前 Front Metal (MTA) – 116 –
    Z8.4 Jiu Li 九里 (中九里 上九里 下九里) Nine Miles – 116 –
    Z8.5 Er Long 耳聾 Deafness (PHA) – 117 –
    Z8.6 San Quan 三泉 (下泉 中泉 上泉) Three Springs – 118 –
    Z8.7 Shen San Tong 腎三通 (通腎 通胃 通背) Three Kid – 119 –
    Z8.8 Guo Ming 過敏 Allergy (PHA) – 119 –
    Z8.9 Bai Chong Wo 百蟲窩 Hundred Insect Burrows – 120 –
    Z8.10 San Huang 三黃(明黃 天黃 其黃) Three Yellows – 121 –
    Z8.11 Dan Huo 膽火 (火枝 火全) Gallbladder Fire – 122 –
    Zone 9 Ear – 123 –
    Z9.1 Er Huan 耳環 Ear Ring (MTA) – 126 –
    Z9.2 Shui Er 水耳 Water Ear (MTA) – 126 –
    Z9.3 Tu Er 土耳 Earth Ear (MTA) – 126 –
    Z9.4 Huo Er 火耳 Fire Ear (MTA) – 127 –
    Z9.5 Jin Er 金耳 Metal Ear (MTA) – 127 –
    Z9.6 Mu Er 木耳 Wood Ear (MTA) – 128 –
    Z9.7 Er San 耳三 Ear Three (MTA) – 128 –
    Z9.8 Er Jian 耳尖 Ear Apex (TEA) – 129 –
    Zone 10 Head and Face – 131 –
    Z10.1 San Hui 三會 (正會 前會 後會) Three Meetings – 132 –
    Z10.2 Si Shen Cong 四神聰 Four Spirit Brightenings – 132 –
    Z10.3 San Zhou 三州 (州園 州昆 州崙) Three States – 133 –
    Z10.4 Zong Shu 總樞 Central Hub (MTA) – 133 –
    Z10.5 An Mian 安眠 Peaceful Sleep (TEA) – 134 –
    Z10.6 Xin Ming 新明 New Brightness (TEA) – 135 –
    Z10.7 Ming Mu 明目 Vision Strengthening (PHA) – 136 –
    Z10.8 Yin Tang 印堂 Seal Hall (TEA) – 136 –
    Z10.9 Bi Gen鼻根 Root of Nose (TEA) – 137 –
    Z10.10 Zhen Jing 鎮靜 Tranquilizing (MTA) – 138 –
    Z10.11 Yao Tong 腰痛 Lumbago (PHA) – 138 –
    Z10.12 Shang Li 上里 Upper Li (MTA) – 139 –
    Z10.13 Si Fu 四腑 Four Fu-organs (MTA) – 139 –
    Z10.14 Yu Yao 魚腰 Fish Waist (TEA) – 140 –
    Z10.15 Qiu Hou 球後 Behind the Eyeball (TEA) – 140 –
    Z10.16 Zheng Ben 正本 Correct Root (MTA) – 141 –
    Z10.17 Bi Tong 鼻通Opening Nose (TEA) – 141 –
    Z10.18 Ma Er Shui (馬金水 馬快水 ) Two Horse Waters- 142 –
    Z10.19 Fu Kuai 腑快Fu Fast (MTA) – 143 –
    Z10.20 Liu Kuai Shui 六快水 Six Fast Water (MTA) – 143 –
    Z10.21 Qi Kuai Shui 七快水 Seven Fast Water (MTA) – 144 –
    Z10.22 Mu Zhi 木枝 Wood Branch (MTA) – 144 –
    Z10.23 Pian Tan 偏癱 Hemiplegia (PHA) – 145 –
    Z10.24 Tai Yang 太陽 Greatest Yang (TEA) – 145 –
    Z10.25 Die E 蝶額 Sphenopalatine (TEA) – 146 –
    Z10.26 Ya Tong 牙痛Toothache (PHA) – 147 –
    Z10.27 Shi Yu 失語 Aphasia (PHA) – 147 –
    Z10.28 Qian Zheng 牽正 Puling Aright (TEA) – 147 –
    Z10.29 Lian Er Shui 臉二水 (水通 水金) Two Face Wat – 148 –
    Z10.30 Jia Cheng Jiang 夾承漿 Adjacent to Container – 149 –
    Z10.31 Wei Tong 胃痛 Stomachache (PHA) – 150 –
    Zone 11 Back – 151 –
    Z11.1 Bai Lao 百勞 Hundred Taxations (TEA) – 152 –
    Z11.2 Xue Ya Dian 血壓點 Blood Pressure Acupoint – 152 –
    Z11.3 Cuo Chuang 痤瘡 Acne (PHA) – 153 –
    Z11.4 Ding Chuan 定喘 Calm Wheezing (TEA) – 154 –
    Z11.5 Ru Xian 乳腺 Mammary Gland (PHA) – 154 –
    Z11.6 Hua Tuo Jia Ji 華佗夾脊 Hua Tuo’s Paraverteb – 155 –
    Z11.7 Yi Shu Pancreas Shu (TEA) – 156 –
    Z11.8 Jie Ji 接脊 Connect Spine (TEA) – 156 –
    Z11.9 Pi Gen 痞根 Glomus Root (TEA) – 157 –
    Z11.10 Yao Yan 腰眼 Lumbar Eyes (TEA) – 157 –
    Z11.11 Shi Qi Zhui Xia 十七椎下 Below the Seventeen – 158 –
    Z11.12 Yao Qi 腰奇 Lumbar Magic (TEA) – 159 –
    Z11.13 Jian Bei 肩背 Shoulder and Back (PHA) – 159 –
    Zone 12 Front – 161 –
    Z12.1 Ying Shu 瘿俞 Goiter Acupoint (TEA) – 162 –
    Z12.2 Mian Tan 面癱 Facial Paralysis (PHA) – 162 –
    Z12.3 Jing Bi 頸臂 Neck and Arm (TEA) – 163 –
    Z12.4 Tong Jing 痛經 Dysmenorrhea (PHA) – 164 –
    Z12.5 San Jiao Jiu 三角灸 Triangle Moxibustion (TEA) – 164 –
    Z12.6 Ti Tuo 提托 Lift and Support (TEA) – 165 –
    Z12.7 Zi Gong 子宮 Uterus/Children Palace (TEA) – 165 –
    Appendix I Categories of Extraordinary Acupoints – 171 –
  5. Brain and Spine (23) – 172 –
  6. Eye, Ear, Nose, Mouth, and Throat (13) – 173 –
  7. Four Extremities (14) – 174 –
  8. Spleen and Fu-organs (18) – 176 –
  9. Liver-Wood (22) – 177 –
  10. Heart-Fire (17) – 180 –
  11. Lung-Metal (50) – 181 –
  12. Kidney-Water (22) – 186 –
    Appendix II Extraordinary Acupoints in the 12 Zones – 189 –
    Appendix III Pinyin Index – 197 –
    Appendix IV English Index – 205 –
    Appendix V Extraordinary Acupoints for Pain – 213 –
    Reference – 219 –

[1] Pingheng Acupuncture is also translated as balance acupuncture (not the Dr. Tan’s Balance Acupuncture) and Chinese military acupuncture.

[2] Ling Shu (靈樞), Spiritual Pivot, one part of Huang Di Nei Jing

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